Home / Recipes / Desserts / Cookies & Bars / Italian Lingue di Gatto (Flat Cookies)

Italian Lingue di Gatto (Flat Cookies)

Lingue di Gatto are Italian cookies that are crispy, chewy, and buttery. Just five ingredients and one bowl. They are perfect served with a cup of tea or even with a bowl of your favorite ice cream!

Flat cookies on a white plate with a cup of tea.


 

I don’t always write a post with an Italian title, so why am I doing it now? Well because the translation to English for these cookies is not the prettiest! Lingue di Gatto means Cat tongues, see what I mean?

And why you ask would a cookie ever be called Cat Tongues/Lingue di Gatto? It’s because of its shape, and the top of the cookie has that rough surface just like a cat’s tongue.

Oh but don’t let that fool you, they are easy and delicious the only thing is I wrote this recipe in grams. Weight is essential in this recipe. I will convert it to imperial but use at your own risk.

Flat cookies on a white plate.

Ingredients

  • Softened butter – the butter should be very soft
  • Powdered/icing sugar
  • Room temperature egg whites – remove from the fridge about 1 hour before using.
  • Flour – all purpose with at least 11 % protein.
  • Vanilla extract

Every bakery in Italy I have been into they always have these types of cookies and lots of them. This is one of the simplest and easiest Italian cookies to make.

The Italian origin of these cookies are in the Piedmont Region, although they are originally from France.

Recipe Instructions

In a large bowl beat the butter and sugar for approximately 5 minutes or until creamy.

Beating the butter & sugar in a mixing bowl.

Add the eggs a little at a time beat for 30 seconds. You don’t want to whip the whites until stiff.

Mixing in the egg whites.

Add in the vanilla and flour beat for 30 seconds.

The flour and vanilla mixed into the bowl.

Add the batter to a pastry bag with a 2a round tip. On a parchment paper lined cookie sheet make 3 inch long sticks, 2 inches apart.

Making the sticks with a pastry bag.

Bake for 10 minutes until they start to turn golden around the edges. Let cool on the cookie sheet for approximately 10 minutes, then move gently move to a wire rack to cool completely.

The cookies before and after baking on the cookie sheet.

How to store the cookies.

Store the cookies in an airtight container, they will keep for up to a week at room temperature, or 2 weeks in the fridge. They can also be frozen in an freezer safe container or bag for up to 1-2 months.

These cookies are usually served at breakfast or as a snack with a cup of coffee or tea. Italians also like to serve them with a dish of gelato or even fruit salad.

Ice cream in a glass bowl with some flat cookies.

Different Ways to Serve Them

If you can resist eating them straight from the baking tray, here are some of my favorite ways to serve them.

Whether you call them cats tongues, flat cookies or go with the Italian name, enjoy these delicate little cookies. They’re so easy and delicious you can’t stop at just one. Enjoy!

Lingue di gatto cookies on a white plate.

More Easy Italian Cookie Recipes

Cookies on a white plate.

Italian Lingue di Gatto (Flat Cookies)

Rosemary Molloy
Lingue di Gatto or Cat’s Tongue a delicious buttery crunchy Italian cookie, perfect with a dish of ice cream or a cup of coffee or tea.
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Total Time 25 minutes
Course Dessert
Cuisine Italian
Servings 22 cookies
Calories 35 kcal

Ingredients
 
 

  • Tablespoons butter softened
  • 6⅔ Tablespoons powdered sugar
  • 2 Small egg whites (room temperature)
  • ½ teaspoon vanilla
  • Tablespoons all purpose flour (at least 11 % protein)

Instructions
 

  • Pre-heat oven to 350F (180C) Line 2 cookie sheets with parchment paper.
  • In a large bowl beat the butter and sugar for approximately 5 minutes, until creamy.
  • Beat in the egg whites half at a time, then beat for 20-30 seconds. You don’t want to whip the whites until stiff. Add in the vanilla and flour beat for 30 seconds.
  • Add the batter to a pastry bag with a 2a round tip, pipe out 3 inch (8 cm) long strips approximately 2 inches (5cm) apart on the prepared cookie sheets.
  • Bake for 10 minutes until they start to turn golden around the edges. Let cool on the cookie sheet for approximately 10 minutes, then move to a wire rack to cool completely.

Notes

It is best to use a scale to make these cookies although I did calculate the imperial measurements (more or less) if you want to try it out. But I cannot guarantee that they will bake up as they should, they may spread too much. 
Store the complete cooled cookies in an airtight container, they will keep for up to a week at room temperature, or 2 weeks in the fridge. They can also be frozen in a freezer safe container or bag for up to 1-2 months.

Nutrition

Calories: 35kcal | Carbohydrates: 4g | Protein: 1g | Fat: 2g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 1g | Monounsaturated Fat: 1g | Trans Fat: 1g | Cholesterol: 5mg | Sodium: 18mg | Potassium: 7mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 2g | Vitamin A: 57IU | Calcium: 1mg | Iron: 1mg
Did You Make This Recipe?Please leave a comment below or pin it to your Pinterest account!

Recipe updated from July 11, 2015.

15 Comments

  1. Hi Rosemary – I watched your daughter’s video on the cookies, and around the 1:24 time, I think’ I noticed something not mentioned in the recipe being poured into the batter w/the egg whites mixture – looked like oil? Please advise, as I will wait to hear from you before making them. Thanks!

  2. I am confused about how to incorporate the egg whites into the batter. Do you NOT beat them at ALL ?? Do you partially beat them til “foamy”, or something else ?? I am hesitant to move forward until I know about this. Hopefully you can respond soon. I’d like to make these for Easter. Many Thanks ! BUONA PASQUA

    1. Hi Nancy, in the instructions it says to beat them for about 20-30 seconds, but not enough that they go stiff. I just uploaded a video so I think that will help you also. Buona Pasqua to you too!

  3. Thanks for this recipe of what we call in France : ‘langue de chat’.
    Just wondering, don’t you need to add some salt to the recipe?
    It is always a great hit at home with ‘mousse au chocolat’ or ‘salade de fruits’.
    Merci.

    1. Hi Emmanuelle, thanks, I received this recipe from a friend and I double checked but no it doesn’t call for salt. Does the French recipe call for salt? Lucky you Paris is beautiful!

  4. I studied a year of Italian in college (plus speaking Spanish gives me an advantage) so I understood the title but I was confused about what you were serving, lol. Now I get it ? These cookies definitely look great with ice cream and something easy to make with my kids and their cousins- I’m hosting weekly sleepovers and they always want to make cookies! I promised them we’d make your Frappes next 🙂

  5. 5 stars
    Mmmm, I would like to be enjoying these with a cup of coffee right now! They look like homemade, tastier versions of MIlano cookies! Thanks for sharing with us at the #HomeMattersParty this week! Hope to see you again Friday!

  6. Thank you for another great recipe. I’ve never heard of this cookie but am definitely going to make it. Have a great weekend.

  7. Well, this is a cookie I’ve never tasted — looks like I have to make it. Italian recipes are not only delicious but have colorful titles. How about Brutti ma Buoni?– Ugly but Good. And there is Saltimbocca — jump in your mouth. Tiramisu etc. I think it’s a good idea that you keep the original title. Have a great weekend.

    1. Hi Marisa, thanks, yes this is a great little cookie, let me know how you like them. Have a great Sunday.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Recipe Rating




This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.